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Honour Your Inner Magpie

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musings sparked by some religious stuff I was reading
elf hill
elisem
In the course of reading something today I came across the phrase "the modern desacralizing of our lives," and it set loose a bunch of thoughts. Some of the thoughts connected up to a fierce discussion quite a while back, which doesn't need rehashing here right now, but one bit from it suddenly glinted at me in a new light. And now I'm thinking about distinctions between the sacred and the profane -- you know, pro fane, that stuff that happens down in front of the holy place, on the ground by just us folks? I've always had, simultaneously, a fascination with the liminal and a tendency not to draw those kinds of hard lines. Which is kind of funny, I guess: how do you get a threshold if everything is all the same place and there isn't a floor plan? And yet, there I am.

Universal liminality? OK, maybe I'll have to put that into the same gentle comedy routine as bisexual separatism, because it makes me nod and giggle at the same time. Huh.

there used to be a magazine i liked, called "enchante'", whose tagline was, "is nothing profane?"

:)

I think I only ever saw one issue (interesting article about opera as magic/ritual/religion), but rejoice! There's a website!

awesome with awesomesauce! i go there now :)

bisexual separatism

I'm going to guess that's an actual thing? And from whom would one separate?

(sorry, not coming up with a way to ask that which doesn't sound as if I'm being snotty, which I don't mean to be)

"From whom would one separate?" That's exactly the point that made me put it in a comedy routine -- well, OK, not a comedy routine exactly, but the startled laugh was useful right then to surprise people into thinking about things a little differently.


I suppose a lot depends on how sacred and profane are defined. If you consider the entirety of the world (and the cosmos) sacred, profanity is harder to come by in some ways (though those destroying the environment fit nicely into that category).

Oooh, very interesting and thinky. Mindfulness practice suggests that anything can be done with one's full attention, which in my mind elevates it to a near-sacred or magical act. If there is such a thing as near-sacred.

I admire a lot of the customs around eating and fasting that many faiths observe, because of the way they can turn an ordinary, mechanical activity--fueling the human--into a reminder of what one believes, and an opportunity to think about how one puts belief into action.

"I admire a lot of the customs around eating and fasting that many faiths observe, because of the way they can turn an ordinary, mechanical activity--fueling the human--into a reminder of what one believes, and an opportunity to think about how one puts belief into action."

This has been in my head a lot, because I'm spending time with someone who's actively practicing many aspects of Judaism, including saying the blessings for food and drink whenever he deliberately eats (as opposed to, say, nibbling cucumbers at a party). I like the mindfulness around that, and the way it shifts, as you say, fueling the human into something more conscious.

This is why I seek out group eating opportunities. There's something about the host/guest dynamic which reinforces the relationship between people in a way that makes me kvell.

Oooh! Am thinking about this, and about something I was saying with a friend about being used well, and the holiness of that.

My brain does not always work right

dragonet2

2013-06-12 09:20 pm (UTC)

I saw 'desacralizing" and thought, "yes, people are really becoming more spineless" or something, then went, "WTF are you thinking?"

Long day at work.

Good post though, after I got over my brain fart.

Re: My brain does not always work right

firecat

2013-06-13 02:45 am (UTC)

For me it was something like "yes, not having tails does seem somehow related to our lives becoming more mundane."

Yep, it all went downhill at the loss of prehensile tails. ;)

Re: My brain does not always work right

natalief

2013-06-14 06:12 pm (UTC)

Yup. Removal of the sacral portion of the spine as a method of self-betterment. ;-p

I went to a week long retreat thingy at st. Johns in collegeville and we spent the time talking about sacramentality, watching Babette's Feast and having deep discussions on catholic universities and where non-Catholics could fit in. It was affirming of my catholic upbringing and also eye opening. Reminds me I need to go to the Franciscan renewal center here in Scottsdale. I hear they are awesome peeps, all Buddhist influenced too.

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